handicap-van-financial-aid


Handicap vans make a huge difference in the quality of life for people with physical disabilities. They offer increased independence, the ability to take trips and so much more. Of course, vehicles are considerable expenses. If you're already struggling with a loss of income, medical bills or other costs, a scooter- or wheelchair-accessible vehicle may seem completely out of reach. Fortunately, there are numerous sources of handicap van financial aid for people with disabilities.

Talk to Dealers and Auto Makers About Handicap Van Financial Aid

Many dealers of handicap vans offer their own financial incentives and assistance. Ask your local dealership about reimbursements or other subsidized programs. Explore their financing options, which may be more generous for people with special needs. They might offer help with van modifications, too, in addition to new or used vehicle purchases. Your dealer will point you in the right direction for finding further assistance. Most of the leading auto makers provide financial aid to people with limited mobility, as well. GM's Mobility Reimbursement Program is just one example.

Seek Agency-Based Handicap Van Financial Aid

There are countless other avenues for receiving handicap van financial aid. Veterans can often find help through the VA. If you're on Medicare or Medicaid, the program may assist you. If you receive social security, apply to the Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS) program. Also, inquire with your state's Department of Health and Human Services. If you have to drive to secure your income, contact your state's vocational rehabilitation agency.

 Non-profit and government agencies that work with people with physical handicaps are prime sources of help. Don't hesitate to reach out to them. Even those that don't provide financial assistance can suggest other contacts. They'll also often help you through grant applications and other processes.

There are a number of other sources for financial aid if you have a child in a wheelchair. Check with agencies such as the Disabled Children's Relief Fund, the United Healthcare Children's Foundation, the M.O.R.G.A.N. Project, the Administration for Children and Families, Easter Seals, the Midwest Special Needs Trust, and the President's Choice Children's Charity. Even your local rotary club may offer some financial assistance.